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Motivation

Omg self-help, motivational discussion topic. Everybody scram! Might seem like kicking open door…
MesmeratioMesmeratio Lord
edited February 2013 in Other Discussions Posts: 203
Omg self-help, motivational discussion topic. Everybody scram!

Might seem like kicking open doors that are already very much open. But I think I've made quite a sharp observation about why most of us aren't as motivated as we want to be.

Basically, Man is not supposed to do something on his own. We only really act on our own out of NEED. So trying to practice a skill or learn a language or whatever, on our own, only rarily works out. You evolved on getting food and shelter and a mate, the rest is just bollocks, why bother learning a language when there's no direct need to speak it? However, we can also rely on others to do stuff with us. The human brain responds very strongly to direct social feedback.

If you want to learn something, you need someone else to tell you it's good, bad or that he's a shitload better than you. Why? Humans are social creatures, we do stuff that much more easily when others do it with us, or are in a rivalry with us.

In our daily lives, we lack direct feedback. In school, you get your grade weeks after you worked. No-one is going to hear your progress in french when you sit alone in your room. How do you even know if you can sing without someone to throw tomatoes at you for singing badly?

In earlier ages, if you wanted to learn something, you often went into apprenticeship. You fetched your master's tools, did his dirty and boring work, cleaned up the workshop afterwards and got a good scolding when you screwed up. It was brutally effective: you bet you made some bloody progress when he told you exactly what you where doing wrong.

In even earlier ages, you probably lived in a tribe. No doubt there would be others your age. What if you where a boy and you had a friend the same age? You'd probably have to learn how to hunt from an early age. So does he. There would be two scenarios (though not incompatable). One: you practice together as a team and learn to hunt together, constantly motivating one another to catch a bigger prey. Two: you have a (friendly) rivalry, constantly showing off a big prey, which in turn motivates the other to catch an EVEN bigger prey.

Both these examples have one thing in common: direct social feedback.


Discuss

Edit: some spelling
Edited
by Psi
Hail @Windy for the FTB server. If disagree, ice titans.

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    WindyWindy Lord
    Posts: 1,110
    It's true that most epic figures in history had strong rivals. More often than not, these rivals stimulated each other to carry out great feats.
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    PsiPsi Lord
    Posts: 158
    The problem I personally have, is that I have a lack of people interested in actually working together (in the same place). They all rather sit at home and do their stuff. Of course they say, they are going to do useful things in that time, but that rarely happens.
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    MesmeratioMesmeratio Lord
    Posts: 203
    @Windlord

    Exactly, it is basic human psychology, could you give us some examples?

    @Psi

    Everyone says they're learning this or that, a month later there's barely more progress than there was 3 weeks before. Maybe you should try to make the option more attractive with tea and biscuits (without instantly making a party of it).
    Hail @Windy for the FTB server. If disagree, ice titans.
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    WindyWindy Lord
    edited February 2013 Posts: 1,110
    Newton vs everyone (Hooke, Leibniz, etc)
    I guess Newton was a grouchy man. He still did communicate on an intellectual level, exchanging ideas with his rivals.

    Einstein vs the founders of Quantum Mechanics (Schrödinger, Bohr, Heisenberg, Pauli, etc)
    Believe it or not, Einstein contributed megaloads to Quantum Mechanics, which he famously proclaimed to be faulty with "God does not play dice". He challenged it till his death.

    I can't think of anymore right now sadly...
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    PsiPsi Lord
    Posts: 158
    I actually tried similiar offerings. I guess they just dislike the idea of actually working on something, which makes it for me kinda impossible to convince them. Maybe I just know the wrong kinds of people in real life...
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    MesmeratioMesmeratio Lord
    Posts: 203
    @Windlord

    Houdini had multiple challengers and always invited everyone to bring their own cuffs.

    @Psi

    We sometimes realise we've outgrown some friends. Doesn't mean they can't catch up.
    Hail @Windy for the FTB server. If disagree, ice titans.
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    MesmeratioMesmeratio Lord
    Posts: 203
    Most people that do something together don't know each other for that long before deciding they ought to start a project. That is usually where it gets stuck, though: there's a danger in starting something together.

    'I'll wait until he starts and contacts me'

    We're all very keen on saying we'll do something, or writing it down. But actually starting it is bloody hard. And when there are two people expecting the other to start, nothing happens.
    Hail @Windy for the FTB server. If disagree, ice titans.
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    MesmeratioMesmeratio Lord
    Posts: 203
    We're all too distracted by stuff. Especially the internet is one big distraction machine. You have to move your arm a few times for an insta-dopamine boost. This is really bad for motivation. You're better off lying in your bed for 6 hours and forcing yourself to get a great idea than spending those hours on the internet.

    Most of us would lose nothing at all if we just left the computer to rot for a few days.
    Hail @Windy for the FTB server. If disagree, ice titans.
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